Best book-to-movie adaptations of the decade

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Best book-to-movie adaptations of the decade

Danielle DiMauro

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The 2010s were a great time for books and movies alike. This decade also gave rise to many book-to-movie-adaptations. Here is a list of some of the best book-to-movie adaptations that were released throughout the 2010s. 

“The Hobbit” series

The 2000s saw the release of the “Lord of the Rings” film series. The 2010s saw the release of the prequels to the “Lord of the Rings” series, “The Hobbit,” namely, in order, “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” (2012), “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” (2013), and “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies” (2014). They were directed by Peter Jackson and based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s 1937 novel, “The Hobbit.” The films were released at a high frame rate of 48 frames per second, exactly double the industry standard 24 frames per second. This made the actors’ movements, particularly those in action scenes, seem sharper than what audiences are used to seeing in films shot at 24 frames per second. 

“The Hunger Games” series

The famous “Hunger Games” book and film series set off a wave of young adult books and book-to-movie adaptations from “Divergent” to “The Maze Runner.” The first film in the franchise, “The Hunger Games” (2012), was directed by Gary Ross. The remaining films in the series, “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” (2013), “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1” (2014), and “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2″ (2015) were directed by Francis Lawrence. Jennifer Lawrence, who plays the protagonist, Katniss, won three awards for her role, namely the Saturn Award for Best Actress, the Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress in an Action Movie, and the Empire Award for Best Actress. This film certainly included much political commentary and was a sweeping pop culture phenomenon for the first half of the 2010s. 

“The Fault in Our Stars”

Based on the 2012 novel of the same name by John Green, the film “The Fault in Our Stars” (2014) is a force of its own. Featuring actors Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort and directed by Josh Boone, the film follows the life of two young adult cancer patients, Hazel and Augustus,  who fall in love with one another. There is no way to watch this film without shedding a tear or two. 

“It” 

“It” (2017) is an adaptation of Stephen King’s 1986 novel of the same name. It follows the story of seven children in Derry, Maine who are haunted and terrorized by an evil shapeshifting being that mostly takes the form of Pennywise the clown. Not only have many people have called this one of the best adaptations of one of Stephen King’s novels, but many regarded it as one of the best films of 2017. If you can’t get enough of Pennywise the Dancing Clown, “It Chapter Two” was released in 2019. 

“Crazy Rich Asians”

“Crazy Rich Asians” (2018) will make you laugh, cry, and feel every emotion in between. The film is directed by Jon M. Chu and based on the book of the same name by Kevin Kwan. This is the first film from a major Hollywood studio to feature a cast filled with a majority of people of Asian-descent since “The Joy Luck Club” (1993). If you couldn’t get enough of the beautiful production design and suburb acting, there are two sequels in development for the following books in the “Crazy Rich Asians” book series. 

“Love, Simon”

“Love, Simon” (2018) is the first film to come from a major film production company featuring an LGBT lead. This is a teen romantic comedy-drama film based on the 2015 book “Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda” by Becky Albertalli. The story centers around a closeted gay boy, Simon Spier, who tries to discover the mysterious pen pal he has befriended (and fallen in love with) on a social platform while fighting a blackmailer who threatens to out Simon to the whole school before he’s ready. Many people praised the film for portraying an LGBT relationship and giving this underrepresented community a romantic comedy that is relatable for them.